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Dining & Drinking

PUBS, PATIOS & BARS: We Bierliebe in Switzerland

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Sometimes drinks just taste better in a particular setting, such as beer with a ballgame in front of it, or a glass of wine with a lush vineyard stretching out to the horizon behind. Such is the case with Bierliebe and Friends, which is nestled along the edge of the River Reuss within paddling distance of Lucerne’s famous covered bridge/causeway.

Lucerne is arguably Switzerland’s prettiest city and the Europe’s oldest timber bridge, Kapellbrücke (Chapel Bridge), which spans the river diagonally and contains a number of historic paintings inside, is its prime attraction. So where better to settle in for in a peaceful and regenerative drink after a few hours of sightseeing? – an experience I was lucky enough to have earlier this month while on a post Air Canada Race 2021 FAM trip excursion.

There are a number of venues chock-a-block to Bierliebe and Friends along the Rathausquai, but one of my colleagues had found this pub/patio a couple of years ago and recommended we return for the service, the beer (and, of course, the view).

As for the former, the owner Vince Vercueil, South African by birth, remembered Ann, and sat with us to chat, explaining that his establishment’s philosophy was “love of beer” and mission to “elevate” Swiss beer, which boasts 1,300 microbreweries.

To that end, Bierliebe doesn’t serve pints or pitchers, rather unique two- and four-decilitre glasses (typical is three), and sampler flights (four glasses). “You won’t get drunk here,” Vercueil laughed, adding, “We’re not a Saturday evening address.” He notes that much of the pub’s clientele is local, despite its prime location on the town’s tourist trail, which helped the business survive the pandemic.

There are 12 local Swiss craft beers on tap to try, ranging from wheat, sour and stouts, to lagers and IPA. There is also wine, cider, whisky, and gin.

“You have a lot of people who want to discuss (Swiss) beer and there’s always someone here to do it,” says Vercueil.

Food is similarly locally sourced with burgers courtesy of a neighbourhood butcher and custom bread made at a local bakery. The “Swiss” gourmet hotdogs and bratwurst also earn raves.

Patrons can sit inside, with some window views of the bridge, but the patio on the Rathausquai provides the most desirable setting.

In sum, its attributes have garnered awards for Bierliebe and Friends. Add to it my distinguished blessing, and, hopefully soon, yours.

The Pub is open daily from 11:30 a.m. and is easy to find. You’ll see it from the bridge.

With glass purposefully in hand, we at Travel Industry Today continue our series on some of the planet’s best bars, patios and rooftop venues. For more articles in the series, click here:

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First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

TORONTO PATIO GOES AGAINST THE GRAIN

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Toronto’s downtown waterfront isn’t the most user-friendly, with copious condos, office complexes, still-working industrial port businesses, and airport blighting the limited space of Harbourfront. But with one’s back to the city, looking out onto Lake Ontario, the harbour and encompassing islands are surprisingly idyllic – which is why a rare restaurant-patio like Against the Grain is worth its weight in gold.

Though it’s been around for a decade, I discovered the “urban tavern” only last week thanks to a first post-pandemic (?) luncheon with the new director of the German National Tourism Office in Canada, Anja Brokjans, whose office at VoX International is across the street. Located in the Corus building on Corus Quay (near the bottom end of Jarvis Street on Queen’s Quay), ATG plays up its position as one of Toronto’s only waterfront taverns, and with a spacious lakeside patio to boot (seating is first-come, first serve Thursday-Sundays, reservations available at other times.)

We took advantage of the patio recently (on what was proclaimed to be the hottest day of the summer), which was festooned with flowers and tables suitably distanced. On this occasion, I didn’t notice the firepits or lounge seating that are usually a popular feature.

However, it was the view of the harbour that commanded attention (other than each other), including passerbys casually strolling by along the lake’s edge.

Bar

Anja and I settled for soft drinks and sparkling water for our meal, but an extensive bar list beckoned for future occasions, especially a beer list featuring close to three dozen brews. About half of those are available on tap, ranging from local city favourites such as Mill Street and Steam Whistle to a few from further afield – Muskoka Brewery, the US (Rolling Rock), Belgium (Stella Artois) and Ireland (Guinness). Non-beer lovers will find a fine wine list and cocktails, served from the inside bar.

Food options were similarly inspired and eclectic – “donut holes” for dessert gives you the idea – and ranging from oysters to noodle bowl, jerk chicken to Hawaiian Ribeye, and various “hand-helds,” i.e. burgers and sandwiches. I tried the buttermilk fried chicken sandwich (so tall I had to use a knife and fork, and so much, I couldn’t finish); and if Anja doesn’t mind me saying so, she opted for a bowl for mushroom risotto, managing it with more grace than I couldn’t manage with my gigant-o sandwich.

All in all, Against the Grain was a great spot to enjoy a great day on the waterfront. Next time: indoors in the winter.

With glass purposefully in hand, we at Travel Industry Today continue our series on some of the planet’s best bars, patios and rooftop venues. For more articles in the series, click here:

PREVIOUS ARTICLES: https://travelindustrytoday.com/pub-patio/

 

First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

DISTILL OUR BEATING HEART: Whiskey returns to New York

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The Big Apple is home to countless iconic pubs, pleasing patios, and brain cell limiting bars, but for more than 100 years, no whiskey distillery has called Manhattan home. That’s now changed with the opening of Great Jones Distilling Co., Manhattan’s first and only legal whiskey distillery since Prohibition.

Like many other architectural projects in New York, the distillery is a feat of ingenuity. The six-year construction journey has overcome rigid city regulations, centuries-old fire codes, and a global pandemic to deliver a new spirit to the city and give New Yorkers their own whiskey distillery. The result is a 2,600 sq.-m. space at 686 Broadway in the NoHo district (between SoHo and Greenwich Village), comprised of a custom-built distillery where people can take part in tours and tasting experiences (starting Aug. 21), as well as a restaurant, speakeasy, and event venue, which will open in September.

Founded by Proximo Spirits and fuelled by the vision of owner and 11th- generation spirits maker Juan Domingo Beckmann, the distillery embodies the notion that the best spirits should reflect their origins, in this case threading the history of bourbon in New York to the present day.

To that end, the whiskies are made exclusively with grains grown in the rich ebony soil of the Black Dirt region less than two hours north of Manhattan in Upstate New York, resulting in whiskies that are smooth, balanced, and complex, with a distinctive spiciness characteristic of the New York-grown grains from which they are made. More spice, less sweet – more New York.

“The opening of Great Jones Distilling Co. represents a landmark moment for spirits and New York City history, bringing the craft of whiskey distillation back to Manhattan after 100 years,” says company founder Juan Domingo Beckmann, Founder of Great Jones Distilling Co. and Proximo Spirits.

With the opening of the distilling company comes the introduction of three new whiskies: Great Jones Straight Bourbon, Great Jones Four Grain Bourbon, and Great Jones Rye Whiskey. The three signature liquids are made from 100% New York-sourced grain and have been aging for the past five years in new charred American oak barrels at Great Jones’ sister distillery, Black Dirt.

Construction of the expansive distillery space conquered many unique challenges. Located in an area of the city with a rich history from the Prohibition era, the 82-year-old building had to be reinforced deep below ground to support the custom combination copper pot still with two columns housed on the second floor, navigating the subway system that runs below the building. During the renovation, a secret tunnel was discovered, thought to be used to transport whiskey and other spirits under the streets of New York. This tunnel now runs directly behind the speakeasy, which is set to open this fall.

The visitor experience at Great Jones includes:

• Distillery tours and guided whiskey tastings and experiences

• The Restaurant at Great Jones (opening September), a refined yet
approachable culinary experience offering a contemporary menu focused on locally sourced New York ingredients.

• The Speakeasy: An intimate underground spot featuring a restaurant and exclusive tasting menu

• The Lounge: An exclusive enclave for guests and space for private events

• The Shop: Offering merchandise, plus the distillery’s three signature spirits. Four Grain Bourbon and Great Jones Rye Whiskey are both sold exclusively at the distillery while Great Jones Straight Bourbon Whiskey is sold both on-site at the distillery as well as at bars and retailers in New York and New Jersey.

Great Jones Distilling Co. is open Wednesday-Sunday from noon to 10 p.m. Distillery tours are available to those 21 and older and are available for booking.

https://www.greatjonesdistillingco.com/book-your-visit/

With glass purposefully in hand, we at Travel Industry Today continue our series on some of the planet’s best bars, patios and rooftop venues. For more articles in the series, click here:

PREVIOUS ARTICLES: https://travelindustrytoday.com/pub-patio/

 

First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PEELING BACK THE LAYERS ON A BERMUDA INSTITUTION

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With the prospect of returning to Bermuda at hand thanks to the return of Air Canada flights starting Aug. 6, thoughts of very important travel logistics arise — not least, where to go for a good on-island pint. A requisite choice is at the Royal Naval Dockyard, one of the island’s top tourism spots and home to a host of boutiques, restaurants, and bars, not least The Frog & Onion.

The Dockyard is a cruise port, flush with history and also providing an endless list of activities, from bike rentals to snorkelling cruises, mini golf, dolphin encounters and more – but not one of them that would not be enhanced by a call at the Frog.

Never mind the grog (we’ll get to that), the British pub is uniquely situated in a converted 18th-century stone cooperage that once provided barrels for Britain’s Royal Navy. The décor drips with military history and nautical memorabilia, and one can imagine blacksmiths at work at the large, authentic stone fireplace in the dining room .
A famous and favourite west end pub for locals and tourists, the Frog naturally pulls a cruise crowd when ships are in port, which is acknowledged with a line of international flags, including Canada’s, hanging from the ceiling. There is also outdoor seating in a beer garden and guests are treated to live music in the summer.

And the beer… the onsite Dockyard Brewing Co., Bermuda’s only craft brewery, produces half a dozen beers and ales, including the signature Somers Amber ale, a traditional English bitter, while a sampler offers a taste of all six. Souvenir-seekers can keep the glass if ordering the 50-ouncer, pulled perfectly by expert barmen.

The pub also says it is the only establishment in Bermuda to specially blend its own rum, dubbed “Frog Grog,” comprised of four parts rum and one part water – a recipe they say was officially coined as “grog” by British sailors in the 1700s.

Meanwhile, traditional pub grub is served, including British favourites like savoury pies, bangers and mash, home-made pot pies, Cornish pasties, and weekend roast with prime rib and Yorkshire pudding. There is also a British Pub Curry menu, plus plenty of less exotic fare, from burgers to calamari and fish sandwiches and chowder. Kids have their own menu.

Located a short walk from King’s and Heritage wharfs in the Royal Naval Dockyard, the Frog & Onion is open every day from 11:30 a.m. to midnight (hours may vary during pandemic). WiFi is free.

By the way, if you’re wondering about the name, the founders of the establishment in 1992 explain that it reflects their heritage: one a Bermudian and the other a Frenchman.

With glass purposefully in hand, we at Travel Industry Today continue our series on some of the planet’s best bars, patios and rooftop venues.

PREVIOUS ARTICLES: https://travelindustrytoday.com/pub-patio/

First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

A TRUFFLE-HUNTING ADVENTURE IN UMBRIA: Unearthing the diamonds of the gourmet world

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I’m walking through Pettino’s truffle-rich forests and pastures at the base of a mountain. Leading the way are four specially trained dogs – Pucci, Pippo, Vespa and Enea – and hot on their heels are the truffle hunters Luciano and Bruno, armed with small picks and a leather bag for the loot.

Truffle hunting is a centuries-old daily tradition in Umbria. “It’s an everyday part of our lives,” says Bruno. “We go out almost every day. We are the caretakers of the truffle mountain and forests, and the keepers of many generations of recipes. We eat truffles, we produce condiments from them, we sell them. This is how we live.” It’s a beautiful and simple way of life – the secluded Umbrian mountains, the ancestral hamlet that’s been home to truffle hunters since the 15th century.

Today, next to the river, we’re in search of white truffles, the rare bulbous tuber that cannot be cultivated in the same way as its black counterpart. Pucci disappears into the undergrowth, quickly followed by Bruno, her handler. He produces his vanghino, a specialist excavation tool, and unearths an onion-size white truffle. This excites Pucci as she knows what’s coming – a treat in the form of some dried pasta.

Truffles exude a chemical that imitates the mammalian reproductive pheromones, so for an animal, just sniffing it is akin to being drugged. Initially, female pigs were used to find truffles, but when they latch onto its aroma, they’re driven wild and often end up eating their finds. This gave rise to the training and use of truffle-hunting dogs, usually traditional water breeds such as pointers, spaniels and setters, which by law must be highly trained. In theory, they can be of any age, although the best results are attained in three- to six-month-old pups.

Bruno has just started telling me about the price per kilo for black truffles – in excess of £250 – when he hears frantic digging among the trees and sets off in search of Pippo. Moments later, he emerges from beneath the undergrowth, holding an egg-size white truffle between his thumb and index finger. “This,” he says, “is ten times the value of black truffles.” He hands it to me, and I feel its weight in my palm, smell its luscious, slightly garlicky scent, which Bruno tells me is ideal for enhancing the flavour of any dish.

We find just a handful of truffles in our hour-long trek, so the dogs are transported to the nearby estate of San Pietro a Pettine, which is higher up the mountain. Here, we’ll set out to find black truffles, which are buried among roots in select patches of hillside oak and hazelnut groves.

Umbria is the single largest producer of truffles in Italy. In meeting the worldwide demand of international chefs, professional truffle hunters can earn up to £20,000 a season, passing their finds through a series of highly competitive and carefully guarded truffle-market channels before reaching their destinations abroad.

Today, however, our truffles are only going as far as the estate’s restaurant, La Cucina, where the chef Alicia Capuricci uses them to prepare a delicious lunch for us. We start with an egg that has been slow poached for 90 minutes, coated in panko, deep-fried, then served atop creamy mashed potato. This is accompanied by a parmigiana fondue and a heavy handful of white truffle shavings (the very ones we have just brought in from the woods), which taste oaky, nutty and a little earthy, with back notes of olives. “Black truffles’ spores smell stronger than the flavour, but even the strongest will never overpower other ingredients on the plate,” says Alicia, who uses the fungi like a vegetable, shaving it onto just about anything – including ice cream.

Later, at La Pintura, my farmhouse retreat near Trevi, Nonna Ciarletti is making dinner. I’m sitting at a battered 10-seater wooden table, beside a slow-burning log fire, in the company of Gianfranco Ciarletti, my host and a fourth-generation olive farmer. Together, we dine on a harmonious mix of brochettes of meat toasted on open coals, wafers of cured ham, topped off with lashings of home-grown olive oil. Then the soul food makes an appearance – a dense vegetable broth with a fistful of grated truffles and a liberal sprinkling of parmesan cheese, plus a good glug of olive oil. Silence descends on the farmhouse as we lose ourselves in truffle heaven… 

Umbria: the ultimate foodie guide

Where to make traditional pasta: In the picture-postcard village of Scheggino, clamber down a flight of narrow stone steps to Restaurant Osteria Baciafemmine, where the chef Elisa Valentini will demonstrate the pasta-making process to interested visitors. “The region’s typical pasta is umbrici, made from flour and water,” she explains. “After kneading the dough, it is rolled out, then hand-cut into a cord-like spaghetti strips. Of course, the ideal condiment for our umbricelli is truffles.”

Where to celebrate truffles: On 4 and 5 April, Scheggino plays host to the Diamante Nero festival. Browse stalls groaning under the weight of fresh truffles, buy truffle marmalades, oils and other condiments, sample local products such as cheese, lentils and saffron, and discover traditional crafts such as handwoven fabrics. There are also numerous cooking demonstrations and tastings, and hands-on activities for kids, but the highlight of the weekend is attempting to set a Guinness World Record for a giant truffle frittata.

Where to learn more about truffles: Visit the Museo del Tartufo Urbani in Scheggino to delve into the history surrounding its ‘black diamonds’; and while you’re there, stock up on all your truffle requirements in the excellent museum shop.
Where to stayCastello di Monticelli, near Perugia, is a preserved sixth-century fortress turned boutique hotel festooned with mediaeval characteristics in each of its 26 suites – expect fireplaces, terracotta floors, oak ceiling beams and chestnut windows that frame views of the valley and Perugia in the distance. It’s surrounded by two acres of gardens and terraces; six acres of forest and a large patch of land where organic produce is grown. Alternatively, for a more rustic experience, stay at La Pintura, which offers refined farmhouse-style accommodation on a working olive farm. On offer are four comfortable en-suite rooms, dressed in handmade bed linens and curtains.

How to get there: Get a flight to London Heathrow then a cheap connecting flight either via Ryanair, which flies to Perugia three times a week from London Stansted Airport; alternatively, later this summer, British Airways will launch a new route from Heathrow.

www.umbriatourism.it

First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PEI PUB A CLAM DUNK

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You won’t often hear me say this, but it’s not always about the beer. In fact, in this case, it’s about the clams – marvellous mollusks from PEI, served and savoured at the treasured island establishment, Clam Diggers. And if you don’t believe me, believe renowned Canadian chef (and islander) Michael Smith, who raves about the place.

Located in Cardigan on the island’s east end, near Brudenell provincial park and about 45 km from Charlottetown, the ‘beach house and restaurant,’ which has also been called a waterfront pub, is known for its seafood – a veritable best of the best in a Canadian mecca for ocean bounty.

Familiar Food Network contributor Smith – now an innkeeper on the island and cookbook author, and who has in the past served as ambassador for PEI tourism at events in Toronto, where I’ve met him on a few occasions – was quoted in a recent article by Jeremy Reed as going so far as to call the “steamers” served at Clam Diggers “the epitome of perfection and simplicity.” They are served in white wine, butter, garlic and cream, and Smith says, “I’ll fight ya for slurping rights at the bottom of the bowl.”

Also lauded by patrons are the fried clams, as well as other local favourites and Clam Digger classics like haddock and chips, fried scallops, mussels, lobster roll, crab cakes, maple salmon, and, of course, lobster (in season). Some of the items are served together in combo “bake” plates.

 

Clam Diggers

Not a seafood fan? Not to worry, there are also burgers, sandwiches, and wraps, salads, pasta, steak, even poutine and mac & cheese.

And accompanying local craft beer (Gahan) on tap, including during afternoon happy hour (3-5 p.m.), is pub fare like wings, nachos, sweet potato fries, and fish tacos.

Any of the choices can be enjoyed indoors or, better still, out, on a large patio deck, overlooking the water, where guests can watch fishing and lobster boats glide by and catch the harbour lights and sunset in the evening, or wander on a lighted boardwalk. Indeed, the restaurant’s well-deserved motto is: “Come for the food, stay for the view.”

Located at 6864 Water St. in Cardigan, Clam Diggers is open daily from 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., 9 on Fridays and Saturdays

Clam Diggers

With glass purposefully in hand, we at Travel Industry Today continue our series on some of the planet’s best bars, patios and rooftop venues. For more articles in the series, click here:

PREVIOUS ARTICLES: https://travelindustrytoday.com/pub-patio/

First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PUBS, PATIOS & BARS: Tea with a twist (of gin)

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There’s nothing wrong with a nice afternoon tea, but typically it’s not the purview of this column (let’s be honest, we’ve never, ever, never, talked about tea before). However, lest you think I’m soused (more likely than writing about tea), this time there is a twist: Tea at the Grand Central Hotel Belfast, Northern Ireland, is now paired with the world’s largest bottle of gin.

The luxury hotel, which lays claim to having Ireland’s tallest cocktail bar (an important feature as you will see), teamed up with local gin distiller Jawbox Spirits to unveil the huge Giant’s Edition bottle, which is the attraction of the playfully named “G & Tea” afternoon tea experience, also dubbed “tea with a twist,” and now served in The Observatory on the 23rd floor of the Grand.

Nearly 1,000 measures of gin are included in the huge Jawbox Giant’s Edition bottle, which takes its name and inspiration from Jonathan Swift’s famous novel Gulliver’s Travels, in which the writer was said to have been inspired by the sight of the Belfast Hills, which he felt resembled a sleeping giant safeguarding the city.

At 73 cm tall, the Jawbox Giant’s Edition holds almost 46 standard bottles of gin, with the huge flagon weighing more than 50 kg and containing a staggering 32 litres of the spirit.

The G & Tea menu includes a selection of delicate sandwiches, scones, and sweet treats inspired by the botanicals and flavours of the gin.

Guests can also sit back, relax, and take in the stunning views overlooking the Belfast Hills, where one of the spirit’s ingredients, Black Mountain Heather, is gathered, while enjoying a new, specially designed Jonathan’s Twist Cocktail.

The G & Tea experience is notably supported by Tourism Northern Ireland and the ‘Embrace a Giant Spirit’ campaign, which is evident everywhere one goes in the streets of Belfast.

The Tea is served daily from 1 to 5 p.m. and is priced at £40 (£50 with the Jonathan’s Twist Cocktail). The hotel is located in the heart of the city at 9-15 Bedford St. in the Linen Quarter.
With glass purposefully in hand, we at Travel Industry Today continue our series on some of the planet’s best bars, patios and rooftop venues. For more articles in the series, click here:

PREVIOUS ARTICLES: https://travelindustrytoday.com/pub-patio/

First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PUBS, PATIOS & BARS: Revealing Jamaica’s secret bars

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While there really is no bad place in Jamaica to grab a Red Stripe, your favourite rum punch, or even a Bob Marley (the drink, not the reggae icon), there are a few “secret” locations that clearly stand apart from well-known spots like Rick’s in Negril or anything on Mo’ Bay’s Hip Strip.

From treetops to hidden caves, visitors can ramp up the romance or discover a unique island location certain to enliven one’s Instagram account and, more importantly, provide indelible memories along the way.

Here are three that are worthy of any bucket list:

Kanopi House

Provision Bar, Kanopi House

Nestled in the treetops on a secluded hillside just outside of Port Antonio, the eco-chic Kanopi House resort is a tip-top location for a scenic drink. The unique treehouse bar, built among 100-year-old Banyan trees, overlooks Jamaica’s famed Blue Lagoon and boasts breathtaking views and a creative menu of rum-based cocktails, wine, beer, and fresh-squeezed fruit juices.

Blackwell Rum Bar

Blackwell Rum Bar at The Caves. Image courtesy Jamaica Tourist Board

This secret cliffside lounge built inside the rugged rockface at The Caves boutique hotel in Negril is an intimate setting for a romantic drink. Guests traverse down a coral staircase and across a wooden footbridge to access the secret grotto bar tucked within the cliff’s volcanic limestone walls. Flickering candles, lapping ocean waves, and elegant handcrafted libations set the scene for an unforgettable evening for guests.

Floyd’s Pelican Bar

Floyd’s Pelican Bar

Accessible only by boat, this offshore watering hole on Jamaica’s South Coast is a true off-the-beaten-path experience. Built on stilts with a thatch roof in the middle of the Caribbean Sea, the rustic driftwood bar serves up a no-frills menu of ice-cold beer, rum punch, and fresh fish.

With glass purposefully in hand, we at Travel Industry Today continue our series on some of the planet’s best bars, patios and rooftop venues.

PREVIOUS ARTICLES: https://travelindustrytoday.com/pub-patio/

First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PUBS, PATIOS & BARS: Why so sour? It’s Whisky Day

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The third Saturday in May (which happens to fall tomorrow, May 15) is World Whisky Day and, with no disrespect to Scotland, Ireland certainly rates as a 1A or 1B when it comes to magical elixir. Or, one might say that Ireland produces the best “whiskey,” Scotland the best “whisky,” though, of course, others may protest for bourbon or, locally, rye. In any case, as one ponders the geographical and…

Source

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PUBS, PATIOS & BARS: A secret gem for Canadians in Paris

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Sometimes one just needs a portion or two of poutine, no matter where one is the world – even the gastronomic mecca of Paris. Fortunately, the Quebecois mainstay (though countlessly culturally appropriated across the globe) can be found in the French capital at an establishment dedicated to providing a petite taste of North America (and specifically Canada) to its patrons. In business since 1999…

Source

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

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