Posts Tagged :

Pubs & Patios

PEELING BACK THE LAYERS ON A BERMUDA INSTITUTION

1080 364 wttc2

With the prospect of returning to Bermuda at hand thanks to the return of Air Canada flights starting Aug. 6, thoughts of very important travel logistics arise — not least, where to go for a good on-island pint. A requisite choice is at the Royal Naval Dockyard, one of the island’s top tourism spots and home to a host of boutiques, restaurants, and bars, not least The Frog & Onion.

The Dockyard is a cruise port, flush with history and also providing an endless list of activities, from bike rentals to snorkelling cruises, mini golf, dolphin encounters and more – but not one of them that would not be enhanced by a call at the Frog.

Never mind the grog (we’ll get to that), the British pub is uniquely situated in a converted 18th-century stone cooperage that once provided barrels for Britain’s Royal Navy. The décor drips with military history and nautical memorabilia, and one can imagine blacksmiths at work at the large, authentic stone fireplace in the dining room .
A famous and favourite west end pub for locals and tourists, the Frog naturally pulls a cruise crowd when ships are in port, which is acknowledged with a line of international flags, including Canada’s, hanging from the ceiling. There is also outdoor seating in a beer garden and guests are treated to live music in the summer.

And the beer… the onsite Dockyard Brewing Co., Bermuda’s only craft brewery, produces half a dozen beers and ales, including the signature Somers Amber ale, a traditional English bitter, while a sampler offers a taste of all six. Souvenir-seekers can keep the glass if ordering the 50-ouncer, pulled perfectly by expert barmen.

The pub also says it is the only establishment in Bermuda to specially blend its own rum, dubbed “Frog Grog,” comprised of four parts rum and one part water – a recipe they say was officially coined as “grog” by British sailors in the 1700s.

Meanwhile, traditional pub grub is served, including British favourites like savoury pies, bangers and mash, home-made pot pies, Cornish pasties, and weekend roast with prime rib and Yorkshire pudding. There is also a British Pub Curry menu, plus plenty of less exotic fare, from burgers to calamari and fish sandwiches and chowder. Kids have their own menu.

Located a short walk from King’s and Heritage wharfs in the Royal Naval Dockyard, the Frog & Onion is open every day from 11:30 a.m. to midnight (hours may vary during pandemic). WiFi is free.

By the way, if you’re wondering about the name, the founders of the establishment in 1992 explain that it reflects their heritage: one a Bermudian and the other a Frenchman.

With glass purposefully in hand, we at Travel Industry Today continue our series on some of the planet’s best bars, patios and rooftop venues.

PREVIOUS ARTICLES: https://travelindustrytoday.com/pub-patio/

First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PEI PUB A CLAM DUNK

1080 494 wttc2

You won’t often hear me say this, but it’s not always about the beer. In fact, in this case, it’s about the clams – marvellous mollusks from PEI, served and savoured at the treasured island establishment, Clam Diggers. And if you don’t believe me, believe renowned Canadian chef (and islander) Michael Smith, who raves about the place.

Located in Cardigan on the island’s east end, near Brudenell provincial park and about 45 km from Charlottetown, the ‘beach house and restaurant,’ which has also been called a waterfront pub, is known for its seafood – a veritable best of the best in a Canadian mecca for ocean bounty.

Familiar Food Network contributor Smith – now an innkeeper on the island and cookbook author, and who has in the past served as ambassador for PEI tourism at events in Toronto, where I’ve met him on a few occasions – was quoted in a recent article by Jeremy Reed as going so far as to call the “steamers” served at Clam Diggers “the epitome of perfection and simplicity.” They are served in white wine, butter, garlic and cream, and Smith says, “I’ll fight ya for slurping rights at the bottom of the bowl.”

Also lauded by patrons are the fried clams, as well as other local favourites and Clam Digger classics like haddock and chips, fried scallops, mussels, lobster roll, crab cakes, maple salmon, and, of course, lobster (in season). Some of the items are served together in combo “bake” plates.

 

Clam Diggers

Not a seafood fan? Not to worry, there are also burgers, sandwiches, and wraps, salads, pasta, steak, even poutine and mac & cheese.

And accompanying local craft beer (Gahan) on tap, including during afternoon happy hour (3-5 p.m.), is pub fare like wings, nachos, sweet potato fries, and fish tacos.

Any of the choices can be enjoyed indoors or, better still, out, on a large patio deck, overlooking the water, where guests can watch fishing and lobster boats glide by and catch the harbour lights and sunset in the evening, or wander on a lighted boardwalk. Indeed, the restaurant’s well-deserved motto is: “Come for the food, stay for the view.”

Located at 6864 Water St. in Cardigan, Clam Diggers is open daily from 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., 9 on Fridays and Saturdays

Clam Diggers

With glass purposefully in hand, we at Travel Industry Today continue our series on some of the planet’s best bars, patios and rooftop venues. For more articles in the series, click here:

PREVIOUS ARTICLES: https://travelindustrytoday.com/pub-patio/

First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PUBS, PATIOS & BARS: Tea with a twist (of gin)

1080 494 wttc2

There’s nothing wrong with a nice afternoon tea, but typically it’s not the purview of this column (let’s be honest, we’ve never, ever, never, talked about tea before). However, lest you think I’m soused (more likely than writing about tea), this time there is a twist: Tea at the Grand Central Hotel Belfast, Northern Ireland, is now paired with the world’s largest bottle of gin.

The luxury hotel, which lays claim to having Ireland’s tallest cocktail bar (an important feature as you will see), teamed up with local gin distiller Jawbox Spirits to unveil the huge Giant’s Edition bottle, which is the attraction of the playfully named “G & Tea” afternoon tea experience, also dubbed “tea with a twist,” and now served in The Observatory on the 23rd floor of the Grand.

Nearly 1,000 measures of gin are included in the huge Jawbox Giant’s Edition bottle, which takes its name and inspiration from Jonathan Swift’s famous novel Gulliver’s Travels, in which the writer was said to have been inspired by the sight of the Belfast Hills, which he felt resembled a sleeping giant safeguarding the city.

At 73 cm tall, the Jawbox Giant’s Edition holds almost 46 standard bottles of gin, with the huge flagon weighing more than 50 kg and containing a staggering 32 litres of the spirit.

The G & Tea menu includes a selection of delicate sandwiches, scones, and sweet treats inspired by the botanicals and flavours of the gin.

Guests can also sit back, relax, and take in the stunning views overlooking the Belfast Hills, where one of the spirit’s ingredients, Black Mountain Heather, is gathered, while enjoying a new, specially designed Jonathan’s Twist Cocktail.

The G & Tea experience is notably supported by Tourism Northern Ireland and the ‘Embrace a Giant Spirit’ campaign, which is evident everywhere one goes in the streets of Belfast.

The Tea is served daily from 1 to 5 p.m. and is priced at £40 (£50 with the Jonathan’s Twist Cocktail). The hotel is located in the heart of the city at 9-15 Bedford St. in the Linen Quarter.
With glass purposefully in hand, we at Travel Industry Today continue our series on some of the planet’s best bars, patios and rooftop venues. For more articles in the series, click here:

PREVIOUS ARTICLES: https://travelindustrytoday.com/pub-patio/

First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PUBS, PATIOS & BARS: Revealing Jamaica’s secret bars

1080 498 wttc2

While there really is no bad place in Jamaica to grab a Red Stripe, your favourite rum punch, or even a Bob Marley (the drink, not the reggae icon), there are a few “secret” locations that clearly stand apart from well-known spots like Rick’s in Negril or anything on Mo’ Bay’s Hip Strip.

From treetops to hidden caves, visitors can ramp up the romance or discover a unique island location certain to enliven one’s Instagram account and, more importantly, provide indelible memories along the way.

Here are three that are worthy of any bucket list:

Kanopi House

Provision Bar, Kanopi House

Nestled in the treetops on a secluded hillside just outside of Port Antonio, the eco-chic Kanopi House resort is a tip-top location for a scenic drink. The unique treehouse bar, built among 100-year-old Banyan trees, overlooks Jamaica’s famed Blue Lagoon and boasts breathtaking views and a creative menu of rum-based cocktails, wine, beer, and fresh-squeezed fruit juices.

Blackwell Rum Bar

Blackwell Rum Bar at The Caves. Image courtesy Jamaica Tourist Board

This secret cliffside lounge built inside the rugged rockface at The Caves boutique hotel in Negril is an intimate setting for a romantic drink. Guests traverse down a coral staircase and across a wooden footbridge to access the secret grotto bar tucked within the cliff’s volcanic limestone walls. Flickering candles, lapping ocean waves, and elegant handcrafted libations set the scene for an unforgettable evening for guests.

Floyd’s Pelican Bar

Floyd’s Pelican Bar

Accessible only by boat, this offshore watering hole on Jamaica’s South Coast is a true off-the-beaten-path experience. Built on stilts with a thatch roof in the middle of the Caribbean Sea, the rustic driftwood bar serves up a no-frills menu of ice-cold beer, rum punch, and fresh fish.

With glass purposefully in hand, we at Travel Industry Today continue our series on some of the planet’s best bars, patios and rooftop venues.

PREVIOUS ARTICLES: https://travelindustrytoday.com/pub-patio/

First published at Travel Industry Today

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PUBS, PATIOS & BARS: Dunedin, a whole new ballgame

1080 494 wttc2

Since 1978, the Toronto Blue Jays have called Dunedin, Fla., home – at least in February and March. And each year thousands of snowbirds trek to the St. Petersburg area (or are lucky enough to already be there) to be a part of the spring training ritual and to catch a few Grapefruit League games before the real season starts back north. And with a new-look TD Ballpark (formerly Dunedin Stadium/

Source

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PUBS, PATIOS & BARS: Why so sour? It’s Whisky Day

1080 494 wttc2

The third Saturday in May (which happens to fall tomorrow, May 15) is World Whisky Day and, with no disrespect to Scotland, Ireland certainly rates as a 1A or 1B when it comes to magical elixir. Or, one might say that Ireland produces the best “whiskey,” Scotland the best “whisky,” though, of course, others may protest for bourbon or, locally, rye. In any case, as one ponders the geographical and…

Source

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PUBS, PATIOS & BARS: A secret gem for Canadians in Paris

1080 494 wttc2

Sometimes one just needs a portion or two of poutine, no matter where one is the world – even the gastronomic mecca of Paris. Fortunately, the Quebecois mainstay (though countlessly culturally appropriated across the globe) can be found in the French capital at an establishment dedicated to providing a petite taste of North America (and specifically Canada) to its patrons. In business since 1999…

Source

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

PUBS, PATIOS & BARS: Salt Lake City ready to serve

1080 494 wttc2

The only thing better than discovering a great pub in a destination is finding a whole bunch of them. And to that end, the tourist promotion board of Salt Lake City, Utah, says it is ready to serve with a special pass designed to encourage visitors to sample the city’s burgeoning brew-pub scene. With Salt Lake better known for its church and famous choir than its beverages, the city’s tourism…

Source

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

DREAMING OF BEER TOWERS IN BOMBAY

1080 494 wttc2

Why not Leopold’s in Mumbai for our establishment of the week? After all, these days we’ve got about as much chance of going there as any of the (unaffiliated) Canadian chain locations of the same name. But, alas, we’re still dreaming of travel as we navigate the third and maybe fourth wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, so I’ll mine the recommendation of a travel pal – a regular pre-pandemic visitor…

Source

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News

BIG CRAIC ATTACK AT THE CROSSKEYS INN

1080 494 wttc2

You’ve likely not been there, but if the image of the Crosskeys Inn looks familiar, it’s because the iconic pub in Northern Ireland is often used by tourism promoters, including Tourism Ireland, to represent the ideal of the pub experience on the Emerald Isle, which is a key driver of visitor interest. But the Crosskeys, located about half an hour outside Belfast, just north of Lough Neagh and an…

Source

First published at TravelNewsHub.com – Global Travel News